First, break all the rules

“Within the last several years, systems and the Internet have assumed a preeminet role in management thinking, to the detriment of the role of people in the workplace. Buckingham and Coffman prove just how crucial good people – and specifically great managers – are to the success of any organnization.” 

Bernie Marcus, former Chairman and CEO, Home Depot

Por Jeff Figueroa

What the world´s greatest managers do differently

Marcus Buckingham is the leader of The Gallup Organization´s twenty-year effort to identify the core characteristics of great managers and great workplaces.

Curt Coffman is the global practice leader for The Gallup Organization´s Workplace Management Practice.

«Out of hundreds of books about improving organizational perfomance, here is one that is based on extensive empirical evidence and a book that focuses on specific actions managers can take to make their organizations better today! In a world in which managing people provides the differentiating advantage, First, Break All the Rules is a must-read.»

Jeffrey Pfeffer, Profesor, Standford Business School and author of The Human Equation: Building Profits by Putting People First.

The greatest managers in the world seem to have little in common. They differ in sex, age, and race. They employ vastly different styles and focus on different goals. Yet despite their differences, great managers share on common trait: They do not hesitate to break virtually every rule held sacred by conventional wisdom. They do not beleive that, with enough training, a person can achieve anything he sets his mind to. They do not try to help people overcome their weaknesses. They consistently disregard the golden rule. And, yes, they even play favorites. This amazing book explains why.

Marcus Buckingham and Curt Coffman of the Gallup Organization present the remarkable findings of their massive in-depth study of great managers across a wide variety of situations. Some were in leadership positions. Others were front-line supervisors. Some were in Fortune 500 companies; others were key players in small, entreprenurial companies. Whatever their situations, the managers who ultimately became the focus of Gallup´s research were invariably those who excelled at turning each employee´s talent into performance.

In today´s tight labor markets, companies compete to find and keep the best employees, using pay, benefits, promotions, and training. But these well-intentioned efforts often miss the mark. The front-line manager is the key to attracting and retaining talented employees. No matter how generous its pay or how renowned its training, the company that lacks great front-line managers will suffer.

Buckingham and Coffman explain how the best managers select an employee for talent rather than for skills or experience; how they set expectations for him or her – they define the right outcomes rather than the right steps; how they motivate people – they build on each person´s unique strenghts rather than trying to fix his weaknesses; and, finally, how great managers develop people – they find the right fit for each person, not the next rung on the ladder. And perhaps most important, this research – which initially generated thousands of different survey questions on the subject of employee opinion – finally produced the twelve simple questions that work to distinguish the strongest departments of a company from all the rest. This book is the frst to present this essential measuring stick and to prove the link between employee opinions and productivity, profit, customer satisfaction, and the rate of turnover.

  1. Do I know what is expected of me at work?
  2. Do I have the materials and equipment I need to do my work right?
  3. At work, do I have the opportunity to do what I do best every day?
  4. In the last seven days, have I received recognition or praise for doing good work?
  5. Does my supervisor, or someone at work, seem to care about me as a person?
  6. Is there someone at work who encourages my development?
  7. At work, do my opinions seem to count?
  8. Does the mission/purpose of my company make me feel my job is important?
  9. Are my co-workers committed to doing quality work?
  10. Do I have a best friend at work?
  11. In the last six months, has someone at work talked to me about my progress?
  12. This last year, have I had opportunities at work to learn and grow?

There are vital performance and career lessons here for managers at every level, and, best of all, the book shows you how to apply them to your own situation.

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